Ask Mr. Enlightenment — A Contest Where Everyone Wins — Again and Again

Jeffrey Chappell, "Mr. Enlightenment"

Have I ever got a treat for you, Blog-Buddies! What if you could ask questions to someone who is both spiritually Enlightened, a terrific writer, and a friend of this blog?

Some recent comments here made me wish I could summon up a “Mr. Enlightenment” or “Ms. Enlightenment” to answer everybody’s questions. You know, questions like, “When you’re with other Enlightened people, what does it smell like?” Or any other practical questions you have been longing to ask.

So I bravely contacted Jeffrey Chappell, author of Answers from Silence. “Bravely” because he is soooooooo scary. 😉

Actually, Jeffrey is one of the best friends a person could have. When Mitch and I got married, we asked him to play the music. Or maybe he even volunteered. Tough to remember precisely because it happened in 1989, after all.

You might wonder how a world-traveling concert pianist would schlep a piano all the way into the park in Maryland where the wedding took place. (In case you’re wondering, Mitch was resplendent in a tuxedo, while I wore an evening gown made of green sequins. And kicked off my shoes, since they were sticking to the muddy grass. It was a Buddhist wedding. Long story, great ceremony.)

Anyway, Jeffrey brought chimes, and the music was just Divine. Even though he wasn’t quite Enlightened yet, if I remember correctly.

Of course, that’s one reason it’s so great when a person works at something that is “dharma,” a good-fit activity in life that you recognize because it moves you into a flow state with joy and effortlessness during the work process and powerful results from that work. Doing your dharma is like an advance peek at Enlightenment.

And everyone does have a dharma, sometimes more than one. For instance, this person, Rose Rosetree, is besotted with:

  • Writing about Enlightenment and how to get there
  • Teaching skill sets of energetic literacy (in part, so we can tell for ourselves when a person does reach spiritual Enlightenment)
  • Healing STUFF that gets in the way of Enlightenment.

Think about yourself in that way, for a moment. What is your dharma in this world?

Of course, another good thing to consider is “What question do you have for this Contest? Which one question would you most like to ask Mr. Enlightenment?”

Enter any time until December 12, 2010. Please ask only one person per incarnation, because I would like everyone to have a chance to enter. It’s free to enter. Use the Comment Box below.

Of course, you may also use that Comment Box for making any comments you like. For instance, do any of you Blog-Buddies have a copy of the audiobook edition of Empowered by Empathy, my how-to for empaths? Guess who volunteered to play the chimes there, too? Any of you notice how that bit o’ chime repeats, repeats, repeats?

How to Win “Ask Mr. Enlightenment”

Just framing a question that would be meaningful to you is one way to win this Contest. What I’m planning to do with all your questions is interview Mr. Chappell, asking all of them. The answers that seem especially interesting will form an upcoming post. Reading that, again, everyone wins.

And given the way an Enlightened person is plugged into eternity, you can use that future article to simulate the experience of talking on the phone with Mr. Enlightenment.

— “Hi, how are you, Jeffrey?”

— “Never better.”

Of course, the conversation ends here. Every time. Until that conversation begins again, within one split second of chiming eternity.

And, sure, there is a not-quite-yet Enlightened version of reading that future post (or the present one) as if receiving the words from eternity. The technique is simple. It just takes a bit of extra human-type time:

Simply read whatever it is again. Read it again. Read it again. Read it again.

But remember, Blog-Budies, when it comes to this particular contest, just enter once. Once. Once. Once.

P.S. In honor of Jim, and all you curious Blog-Buddies:

Okay, ask as many questions as you like. Only be aware that not ALL those questions are going to be asked to Jeffrey and transcribed in our follow-up article.

45 thoughts on “Ask Mr. Enlightenment — A Contest Where Everyone Wins — Again and Again”

  • 1
    Alexey says:

    What were the practical steps you took to become enlightened?

  • 2
    Bridget says:

    When you became enlightened was it an event? And, if so, did you know you were enlightened instantly?

    (Oops, is that two?)

  • 3
    Jody says:

    When you look at your relationships with other people in your life, what are the biggest differences you notice before enlightenment and after enlightenment?

  • 4
    Suzanne says:

    What do you do when homeless people ask you for money on the street?

  • 5

    SUZANNE, JODY, BRIDGET, and ALEXEY, you are doing great with these questions!

    Bridget, having a question with more than one part to it is fine. I’ll give an example myself, related to a thread we’ve explored here at “Deeper Perception Made Practical.”

    Do you feel the need to say things like, “Blessings” when you talk to people?

    If you are angry at someone, or a person has treated you badly in a way that merits clarification or a verbal objection, do you stay silent in order to never speak a negative word?

    Do you sometimes have to speak negative words? If so, do you find it necessary to always pretty things up afterwards by saying things like, “Bless you, my child” or “Namaste”?

  • 6
    Amanda says:

    Did you ever go through a dark time and if so, how did it clear?

    Amanda

  • 7
    Jim Curry says:

    Some of us are not consciously skilled in the energy arts. We are not sophisticated. So, we hear people talk about “energy blocks” or other such obstacles on their path.

    None of the language makes sense to me.

    However, in my language, I think the question is one of authenticity. How can ordinary people become perceptive enough to distinguish between actual limitations and their own laziness or neurotic preferences?

    What is a good clear, concrete method that will allow us to establish full authenticity and motor on toward enlightenment in a businesslike way, whether we have some energy block or not?

    There are at least 1000 million fakes out there—Ms. Rosetree isn’t one of them.

    How can those of us in the cheap seats recognize good advice from bad advice? (Sorry if the question is unclear.)

  • 8
    Jim Curry says:

    I forgot something—beg your pardon. Once obtained, is enlightenment a persistent state, or can you be enlightened for thirty seconds and drop back to lesser status (bummer)?

    Does being enlightened mean that a person is pleasant and smooth to deal with, or could an enlightened person be really cranky and unpleasant—at least part of the time?

    Are there different flavors of enlightenment? For example, ice cream could be vanilla or chocolate or strawberry or mint or…. Ice cream is quite varied.

    Is enlightenment varied in some similar sense, or does one size fit all? Is the “rising of Kundalini” necessary for enlightenment, as some Indian authors write, or are there many other ways? If it is necessary, is there a safe, pleasant, easy, comfortable way to get it done—and get it done NOW????

    Is there any distinct advantage that accrues to an enlightened person, or is it just as hard to haul the water and pay the bills after as before?

    If the path is necessarily arduous, can you suggest a way of guaranteeing for ourselves our own persistence on the path? When all is said and done, is it really all that hard to become enlightened—or is it mainly media hype?

    Why have so many enlightened people, especially from Indian and China, made such a big secret deal for so many centuries about how to become enlightened?

    Wouldn’t it be a good idea if everyone got with the program and got enlightened —perhaps by next month? Why would it be useful to keep it all a deep dark secret?

    You’ve been a good sport, and I’ve overstayed my welcome. Thanks.

  • 9
    Jim Curry says:

    Oh, well, I’ll run down eventually. Could someone become enlightened without ever noticing it?

    Do you know any reasonably public figure—someone we might know—who might be enlightened and not notice it?

    If you are enlightened is there a set of exercises or a daily practice or routine that is required in order to stay at that level—a set of maintenance exercises?

    Certainly a high quality gymnast needs to work out every day—or (s)he won’t be a high quality gymnast. What are the means of maintaining?

    Is enlightenment a terminal goal, or is it merely a way marker? Let me be clearer. Suppose you and 1,000 other people become enlightened, do you then have to start next day working toward Enlightenment The Sequel—a higher and better state that is, as yet, hard to obtain?

  • 10
    Jim Curry says:

    Could you improve your chances for enlightenment by socializing with enlightened people—tennis club, play bridge, that sort of thing?

    How could you prove to yourself that you are enlightened and not simply in a very good mood? What’s different?

  • 11
    Jim Curry says:

    As a solidly unenlightened person, my problems or issues are very mundane. I try to get my life a little better organized. I worry about job and finances. I work on my tennis game. I look forward to the next hike.

    I wonder what would happen if I made another friend—but that’s unlikely in some seasons.

    I go to church (and fume that the sermon told me NOTHING!!!!!!). I’m playing away at superficial things that I hope are going to make life better—and they usually don’t.

    So, as an enlightened person, what are the concerns or problems that you deal with? What occupies your attention? What are YOU working on or working toward? How does the game of striving change for those who are no longer in the cheap seats?

  • 12

    JIM, I am soooo fond of you, and not only because you gave me that great integrity plug.

    I can’t refuse you’all, if you want to ask more than one question.

    So I’ll go back and modify the original post.

    Cheap seats, Jim? 😉

  • 13
    Primrose says:

    Do you dream any more in a symbolic way?

    Is there much in your unconscious, or is it quiet and calm when you’re enlightened?

    And what happened to your birth trauma and any child trauma? Did it fall away, was it felt and cleared quickly, or did you feel connected to source and not have to go through it?

  • 14
    Olivia says:

    What’s up with dolphins? (I’ll leave it at that. Interpret as you like.)

  • 15
    Jim Curry says:

    Pro ball players (tennis, baseball, etc.) do mundane tasks (throwing, catching, sometimes writing) differently (sometimes a LOT differently) than ordinary people. Do enlightened people have special ways of performing ordinary tasks?

    Can you recognize an enlightened person just by watching or listening to them?

  • 16
    Lara says:

    Hmm I just really want to ask the same questions too, especially the first three.

  • 17
    Renee says:

    Why you?? Why Tom Hanks or Meryl Streep?? Why not Deepak Chopra, or Rose Rosetree or me??

  • 18
    Jim Curry says:

    Is Enlightenment a condition cut out of a single cloth?

    Or can a person be partly Enlightened or Enlightened in one area while still lagging in another area?

    Or does the same new condition imbue all aspects of the person’s activity and understanding?

  • 19
    Jim Curry says:

    Have you noticed that very few Enlightened people gather about themselves whole communities of similarly upgraded persons?

    Suppose a person who would like to be Enlightened shows up at an enlightened person’s doorstep. Is it possible to transfer the condition through some sort of (perhaps unexpected) educational process, or is this something that must be done all from the start for each person?

    If, indeed, it is possible to help people along, then why have we never seen that happen on anything like a great scale?

    Even Jesus seemed to have trouble getting through to twelve guys. It should be clear enough that they didn’t all “get” it (Judas, for example) and that the rest didn’t get it all (not both Peter and Paul were right on all points—not possible, they disagreed a lot). Please explain this.

  • 20
    Jody says:

    Can you please describe what is your perception of God?

    For you, is God a direct personal experience at all times, or does the intensity kind of change throughout the day or situationally?

    If you were brought up within a particular religion, does that theology remain in a kind of separate compartment of understanding Who God is (as a description), or does being enlightened make it all clear and personal now?

  • 21
    Suzanne says:

    I think Jim brings up an excellent point in #19. If Darshan, the concept of becoming Enlightened by being in the presence of an Enlightened person, is true — then why doesn’t it happen more often?

    In your experience, are you able to influence other people just by being around them?

    How do you keep your peace with the pace of other people’s evolution?!

  • 22
    Jim Curry says:

    For physical exercise, “no pain, no gain” is true up to a point (and at that point it becomes very dangerous). Physical exercise means that we place measured stress on the physical body in order to elicit adaptive changes—which come from the unseen wisdom of the body itself. Our work just knocks on the door, asking the body to improve itself. It does the work.

    Is there an analogy to enlightenment? Can we place adaptive stress so that we get closer to enlightenment—can we exercise in some sense toward enlightenment as we exercise toward the Boston marathon? On the other hand, are there unhealthy stresses we can self-impose that delay enlightenment? Is the exact reverse true, i.e. if instead of imposing stress, if we impose some sort of reverse-stress—some flavor of pleasure—can that get us nearer?

    (Here, perhaps we could find eating dark chocolate as a path to spiritual glory—well, maybe not.)

  • 23
    Jim says:

    People who work at jobs that require high levels of perception are able to find tune their senses wonderfully, whether they match pearls in Japan or sniff wine in France.

    The downside of this wonderful increased sensitivity is that there are lots of things that annoy them more. The glare at the beach won’t help the pearl lady. Driving by a fertilizer factory won’t help the wine taster. It becomes worse for them when their sensitivities are overwhelmed.

    Is there any sense in which becoming Enlightened makes it more awkward or more difficult to function in ordinary life? Is it in any sense a mall-adaption?

  • 24
    Jim Curry says:

    To here, I’ve meant my questions in a good spirit, and without hostility. Here is a more edged question. It is not my intention to offend.

    I am certainly not the only person in the world who has a poor or perhaps distorted notion of what the New Testament says. Listen to or read any evangelical sermon in the country, and you will see clearly that even most (not all) of those who scream harshly, “The Bible and only the Bible” have no clear idea what the New Testament says. Clueless. Totally clueless. If you ask me to be kind—that IS the kind phrasing. Clueless.

    Surveying the literature, I find that mystics and high order spiritual people write in two veins. Some write endlessly and rhapsodically about how good God is. Others say at length what a good deal it is to be enlightened. Both of these are probably true. Neither is at all useful (to me).

    Why is it that enlightened people tend not to write practically and usefully about the road to enlightenment? Is it the case, then, that people with excellent verbal skills and an ability to communicate well are somehow never the persons who obtain enlightenment? Are verbal/communication skills somehow an impediment?

    Phrased more cynically: Why can’t an all-knowing God pick a prophet who can actually write decently?

  • 25

    All of you are bringing up such great questions, Blog-Buddies. Thank you!

    JIM, I’m especially thrilled to read how you are opening up to ask this whole series of questions, straight from your depths.

    Thank you for sharing. And don’t ever worry about asking something offensive. I can — and do — monitor posts that come in. If something comes in that IS truly offensive, I do keep it off our shared space.

  • 26
    sunny says:

    One of the main purposes in our life is to become Enlightened.

    But how can i recognise my purpose in life (other than the Enlightenment one)??

    How do i know what I am suppposed to do in life?

    Which job, mission, purpose am I supposed to undertake ??

  • 27
    Carol Mories says:

    Jim, you are a gem. Thank you for asking most of the questions that I had and in such an entertaining way.

    Would you allow some of us empaths to merge with you? Could we get a feel for Enlightenment by doing that?

  • 28
    Jordan says:

    Hi Rose and Jeffrey!! Thank you for doing this!

    Jeffrey, do you ever get sick? Do you think it’s possible or at all likely for an Enlightened person to become seriously or terminally ill?

  • 29
    Jordan says:

    Oops, and:

    Now that you’re Enlightened, what is your perception of your life pre-Enlightenment (if/when you make the choice to think about it)?

    How do you feel about all that karma?

    What does its purpose look like to you now?

  • 30
    Jordan says:

    What is bad, icky STUFF anyway? Where does it come from? Is it just the unknown and distortion?

    What do you perceive at the farthest edge of your consciousness?

    Where do you experience limitation?

  • 31
    Jordan says:

    What is sex? What is the big deal?

    Are you at all interested in sex, personally? (I understand if this one doesn’t make the cut, haha).

  • 32
    Carol Mories says:

    I hope Jordan’s question about sex makes the cut. Just my vote.

  • 33
    station says:

    Hello, can you please describe the dynamics of your shift from pre-enlightened to enlightened? Is it simply a matter of a shift in perception (not that this is simple)?

    Do you subscribe to the common belief that the purpose of human life is to “learn” and “evolve” spiritually? If so, how did you arrive at that conclusion? What about other forms of life (animals, plants, single cell microrganisms)?

  • 34
    Amanda Flood says:

    Hello Jeffrey 🙂

    I would like to ask about the experience of being ‘in the moment’. Can you describe it? I’d appreciate hearing about it.

    Sometimes I will have times of being in the moment when everything is just love. It’s an incredibly gentle feeling and feels timeless.

    Often it’s the day after a craniosacral therapy session.

    When it happens I like it, it’s so very beautiful and gentle, but I’m a little questioning of it at the same time because it’s also unusual to me. I had put it down as just another ‘consciousness place’ but it seems from what Rose has written here and elsewhere that this (or something similar) is characteristic of enlightenment.

    Is it characteristic? I’d also like to know if it’s something I should be cultivating? Just writing about it has brought me back there to some degree and I am starting to be able to find my way into it on occasion.

    With many thanks 🙂

    Amanda

  • 35
    Heather Crawford says:

    Greatings Jeffrey and Rose!

    Thank you so much for taking the time to answer some of our questions, Jeffrey. For me, even reading about your Enlightenment is joy.

    I believe that Rose has previously mentioned that it is possible for ALL humans to become Enlightened (please correct me if I am wrong) but is it truly possible for everyone to obtain this level?

    I understand that not everyone would choose this path and therefore it would not be a possiblity. But if I worked hard enough to get rid of my STUFF, is it possible? Or, for some of us, is it not possible in this lifetime?

    Thank you so much, again, for your time 🙂

  • 36
    Heather Crawford says:

    LOL and I also hope Jordan’s question makes the cut…I am curious but I suspect that Jeffrey is human, just like the rest of us 😉

  • 37
    Grace says:

    Do you find that since you’ve become Enlightened that you have fewer problems in life? And/or if you do have problems, is it simply easier to deal with them?

    Did you actively and intentionally pursue getting rid of STUFF (as Rose defines it) as part of your path to Enlightenment?

  • 38
    Jody says:

    I was wondering if your body is more healthy and resilient post-Enlightenment?

    If you do catch a sore throat or tummy bug or something, does that affect your inner state, your mood?

  • 39
    Jenny says:

    Millions of people suffer from insomnia. Do Enlightened people get insomnia?

  • 40
    Jenny says:

    Jeffrey, how responsible do you feel for fixing other people’s problems? So many compassionate people make themselves feel guilty because they are not stopping to help every suffering person who crosses their path.

    Do you stop constantly and bless random people all day long? Or do you set yourself a quota for each day? Or what?

  • 41
    roma says:

    Hello 😀

    I have a personal question for Mr. Enlightenment. If someone close to you does something “offensive,” rude, or abusive toward you… do you perceive it that way for even a moment? Or does it not even bother you?

    And if it doesn’t bother you — how/where do you draw the line between remaining calm and peaceful, and protecting yourself from people who are trying to harm you?

    Thank you!

  • 42
    Anita says:

    I’m not sure I have any new questions to add, per se. Everyone has asked so many good questions, and I especially like the thought and humor Jim put into his questions.

    [LOL, before Anita gets rolling here, I am going to take the liberty of adding numbers to the different questions here. No new questions? Hmmm, let’s count what comes next, shall we? 😉 ]

    1. That said, I am wondering if being Enlightened is something that impacts you in a noticeable way or if it is almost imperceptible, a wonderful add-on to your life and something you might notice if you paid attention but it otherwise doesn’t create any big waves.

    2. Do small and large problems seem more manageable?

    3. Do human problems, whether small or large, impact you?

    4. Or do they seem more distant? For example, do you get irritated if someone cuts you off in traffic or do you just automatically laugh it off?

    5. Do problems with our government or more global ones, such as poverty in third world countries or the thinning of the ozone layer, still irk you in any way?

    6. Do other people – aside from Rose Rosetree, of course – notice that you are different in some way, even if they can’t articulate exactly how you are different? Do they do something like, “Wow, Mr. Chappell, you just seem to have a glow to you that not many other people have, an inner incandescence”?

    7. Does life seem more rich and textured to you as one who is Enlightened – like sunsets are more beautiful, oranges zingier, music more delightful?

    8. Do you live more in the Present Moment now than before you became Enlightened?

    9. Do you remember when and how you became Enlightened? Was it a Moment or something gradual?

    10. What do you think your dharma in this world is?

    11. And how were you able to figure that out?

    12. Do you have any advice to give to the younger generation?

    13. What tips can you give to those of us who aren’t Enlightened about how to live life well?

    14. Do you recommend we become Enlightened ourselves – and if you do, do you have suggestions or tips on how that might occur or how we might accelerate the process?

    Thanks for being such an Enlightened good sport and participating in this wonderful conversation!

  • 43

    ANITA of the 14 questions, I love you so!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • 44

    Thanks, everyone, for these super questions. This contest is now closed. I’ll be interviewing Mr. Enlightnment soon and posting his insights in a future blog article.

    I apologize in advance that there won’t be time to answer every one of these questions — a concept I try to get across with the term “contest” — but many will be, and it’s going to be an adventure for us all. In that sense, every one of us is a “winner.”

  • 45

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