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Candid Thoughts on Rap. A Guest Post by ISABELLA C.

What is the impact on your aura of garbage in the form of music?

What is the impact on your aura of garbage in the form of music?

Rap music may well impact your energy field, whether you purposely listen to it or not.

Yesterday we heard a Millennial male share his thoughts about rap music. Today a Millennial female speaks up. I’d like to hear from more of you Blog-Buddies on your reactions to Kanye West and, beyond that, rap music in general.

As a smart Post-New-Age consumer, that matters to YOU. Performances do impact you, all the way down to your aura.

STUFF can result. Frozen blocks can be deposited. And, of course, listening to any performer with interest for a minute or longer will almost always result in your having a cord of attachment to that performer. As well as a spiritual tie. However large. However lovely.

You DO know what the exception is right? About why you might not have a cord of attachment to that performer.  

Toss your answer into our COMMENT box below, Blog-Buddies. Hint: Very likely, the answer is not what you’re expecting.

And if you care about protecting yourself energetically, whether you like rap music or not, you have skin in this game.

Whether you’re a Millennial or not, you did not grow up in a time before radio. Or sound recordings. Entertainment is not just done by the wandering minstrel or the great travelling storyteller who visits your village every few years.

You’re not just entertained by performers at your local church, or the rare concert. Back in the day, music would have been made locally, by people you already new. But now? Haha. Your energy field is being impacted constantly, even by entertainment in the form of “commercials.”

All of these performances impact your aura, like it or not

Here come some candid thoughts from ISABELLA, following our Aura Reading of Bad Boy Kanye West and Aura Reading of Bad Boy Kanye West.

Hatred Packaged as Entertainment

I get it and I sometimes enjoy rap. I’m young enough to have grown up with it.

The persistent misogyny is hard to take, though. Just this morning, in my car, I heard a line that went something like, “So big it’s like you got a foot in your mouth.” Said very menacingly and with a subtext of hatred.

Casual entertainment? As a woman, I’m supposed to just laugh it off or I’m accused of having a stick up my ass?

And even speaking up makes me some kind of severely unnattractive “feminazi”? Please.

Yes, I can turn the station, and I did. However this stuff is often blasted in public spaces and is highly influential on young people.

When Rap Music Imprints Us to Accept BDSM

On the subject of BDSM, discussed here recently, I remember a moment a few years ago, in the gym of my old apartment complex. Rihanna’s song “S&M” was playing over the loudspeakers…

“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but whips and chains excite me…”

I’d heard the song a million times. In grocery stores, stadiums… now in my gym…. I felt incredulous. Is this Sodom or Gomorrah?

Rihanna and Eminem also have a song about loving your abuser, “I Love The Way You Lie.”

Some of this garbage is ridiculous, and when I hear it played over and over I am baffled that there is no controversy.

I knew a woman who would listen to the Kanye/Jay-Z song “Ni**as in Paris” every morning before work to get pumped up.

I liked that song as much as the next person when it came out (even though I would always turn it down during a particularly awful Kanye verse), but I found it sort of horrifying that someone (especially a female) had the kind of life where that was first-thing-in-the-morning kind of music.

That would brutalize my nervous system. Ugh.

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  1. 1
    Sandra says:

    Isabella, I find it amazing, as well, that some of these lyrics are tolerated in the name of artistic freedom. People and the press are far less tolerant when misogynistic, racist and homophobic comments are made in a public forum.

  2. 2
    Sandra says:

    Rose, I don’t think you would have a cord of attachment to a performer if you wore ear plugs during the performance. 🙂

  3. 3

    You won’t have a cord of attachment to a performer if you’ve already cut it. I’m thinking that’s not the answer you’re looking for, though…

  4. 4

    It seems to me that one time you may have said that you won’t get a cord of attachment to someone who’s already dead. I don’t understand why not, so maybe I’m remembering incorrectly.

  5. 5
    Emily says:

    Not if they died before you ever came across them!

    (Will definitely post more, just have lots of work this week :)))

  6. 6
    Tehya says:

    Enjoyable read, thank you Isabella.

    I definitely don’t enjoy rap as much these days, and your post describes why. Even if I enjoy the music and the artistic talent–the lyrics don’t generally fall under the category of “entertainment” for me.

  7. 7
    Tehya says:

    In the past, under a different mindset, I could maybe get into the drama of something like “Love the Way You Lie,” but I don’t relate to that glorification of chaos now.

  8. 8
    Tehya says:

    Actually, a lot of music is difficult to relate to if you aren’t excited by chaos (or domination or being some sort of super-desirable sex maniac).

  9. 9
    David B says:

    One of the things its useful to consider is the distinction between the music and the lyrics. There can be powerful music, sung by someone with great presence.

    But then, most of the words you hear are about loss and co-dependency and need, or in this case, anger.

  10. 10
    David B says:

    The classic example to me is Cohen’s song Hallelujah. Ancient song, revived, that speaks to our souls. And then those downer lyrics?

    It can make a difference if you ignore the words and just enjoy the song. But that can be hard to do. And I really think our culture doesn’t get the impact this constant message has on us.

  11. 11
    Amanda says:

    I’m going to be perhaps a little controversial here. 🙂

    I’ve thought exactly the same, and understand this post. I used to drive my kids to school with Kiss FM on the radio and subject them to exactly the same opinions.

  12. 12
    Amanda says:

    Having kids is consistently humbling: they basically made it clear I had a bit of a bee in my bonnet and was getting overexcited.

  13. 13
    Amanda says:

    They certainly never went so far as to accuse me of being a severely unattractive feminazi (which I’m sure would be as ridiculous applied to me as to you) but they did make it clear that I had gone into opinionated battle mode in my head, and I have to admit I was on some kind of mission to convert them.

    “Listen to that line! Dreadful! What is that doing to your poor subconscious?”

  14. 14
    Amanda says:

    It just fell away after that when I noticed they were right. Examining conflict between the sexes might be interesting but when all is said and done, getting involved just keeps us in conflict mode and holding off one aspect of life.

    Now, I am not bothered and feel happier for it. I expect at some point the same will happen for you and I hope it does.

    So – perhaps a little controversial. But this is a group more concerned with freedom and peace than opinions so I feel comfortable posting it.

    All the best to every one of you 🙂

    Amanda

  15. 15

    AMANDA, all this is sweet. I don’t really get where the dreaded controversy might be, though.

    What I took from this is that you had been concerned about yourself and your kids over rap music, got feedback from them, and stopped worrying.

  16. 16

    When it comes to inner serenity, I think it’s important to note that we can experience a deep down serenity whether liking a particular kind of music, disliking it, or anything in between. As you know better than most, AMANDA, one’s Who-You-Be is not about taste in music, or anything else on the surface of life.

    As always, AMANDA, it’s lovely to hear from you at the blog. 🙂

  17. 17

    Oh, duh! Could it be you were saying, with that wonderful British politeness, that your kids aren’t noticing any problems and you’re not fussed about that music now…

    so, therefore, the music is not having a detrimental impact on their auras?

    As in, ha, you’re disagreeing!!!

  18. 18

    Ooh, but these aren’t mutually exclusive at all.

    In fact, there can be a whole cohort, or group in collective consciousness, that needs to go through a certain experience.

    Not ideal for somebody not in that particular group but definitely necessary for those who feel drawn to the experience….

  19. 19
    Emily says:

    This is so interesting! Rap isn’t my favourite musical genre but it was extremely prominent when I was a child and a teenager along with RnB and Hip Hop in general.

    I remember being ten or eleven years old and the boy I had a crush on loved Eminem and so I loved him too. I didn’t really like any female rappers until Nicki Minaj came along.

  20. 20
    Emily says:

    And I also relate to Leo’s post where he talks about Kanye’s initial work and potential becoming overtaken by his ego :), I prefer Jesus Walks to most of his newer stuff. A lot of my peers and those younger than me do listen to a lot of rap.

  21. 21
    Amanda says:

    Haha, yes Rose, I was disagreeing politely, with the added nuance of actually having been there.

    I was fussing about something that I didn’t need to fuss about.

    I’ve done that a lot. Meet the resistance to something, vociferate my opinion, get through it, love a little more, fail to learn from the mistake and do it all over again with something else!

    😀

    Amanda

  22. 22
    Amanda says:

    On serenity, I would say this is serenity getting through to me in my unconscious areas. They rise up and get cleaned out.

    Amanda

  23. 23
    Amanda says:

    And a big thank you for the remark ‘dreaded controversy’!

    I never know how attached people are to their opinions. When they’re attached enough to get defensive / rude it’s not pleasant, so I try to find polite ways to put things.

    Very British indeed 😀

    Amanda

  24. 24
    Kira says:

    David B., about your comments 9 and 10, that’s exactly how I listen to most music. I’m interested in hearing the lyrics the first time or two until I know what it’s saying, but after that, if I don’t like the lyrics but I do particularly like the music, I ignore the lyrics.

  25. 25
    Kira says:

    I also would like to agree with Amanda about the lyrics impacting my subconscious, given that one song I particularly like and even sing in karaoke is “Grenade”–that would be a horrible relationship in real life!–but I don’t actually know whether it does or not.

  26. 26
    Kira says:

    I think I like some of the songs I do, in spite of lyrics I don’t agree with, because I’m an actress. Even when I’m not acting on stage, I kind of like trying on emotional states temporarily. I can do that with singing, too, or even listening to songs. I also do that with role-playing games and video games.

  27. 27
    Emily says:

    There seem to be certain situations when I listen to rap, for example when I am reminiscing about my youth.

    Maino ft Tpain “All of the Above” reminds me of when I was at a campus university and really depressed but got out of it. I think when I was 19 I listened to that song 1000 times.

  28. 28
    Emily says:

    The first chorus is as follows :

    “Tell me what do you see,
    When you looking at me,
    On a mission to be
    What I’m destined to be,
    I’ve done been through the pain and the sorrow
    The struggle is nothing but love
    I’m a soldier a rider a ghetto survivor and all the above,
    Hey all the above, all the above, all the above
    All the above, all the above, all the above, all the above”

  29. 29
    Emily says:

    I know I’m not black, nor did I suffer the extreme poverty and isolation that Maino did growing up, but this song never failed to uplift me and make me feel like I had power in my life, in a time where normally I felt powerless and unsafe.

  30. 30
    Emily says:

    There is also Atmosphere, who rap about friendship “To all my friends”, and about life in general without the misogyny that is so prevalent within the genre. I like their song “Sunshine” in particular.

  31. 31
    Emily says:

    Also I took street dance classes as a teenager and I still enjoy dancing to hip hop, rnb and some rap music on occasion.

    I agree with Leo, that some people can use it to feel pumped up.

  32. 32
    Emily says:

    For example, if I need to get something done and it’s already 2 in the morning I might listen to rap music to get me through.

    If I have a particularly painstaking and time-consuming task at work, I might just put my headphones on and listen to one song over and over again until it’s done.

  33. 33
    Emily says:

    Although I don’t really listen to rap that is particularly violent or misogynistic, I do think though that I haven’t really considered its effects on my aura.

  34. 34
    Emily says:

    I do consider a lot of things and how they might affect me.

    I don’t watch violent or scary movies, I avoid listening to or watching advertisements as far as possible, I refuse to listen to sexist or other ist comments and call them out when I hear them.

  35. 35
    Emily says:

    I researched with Rose and Isabella the effects of various hobbies, activities, jobs and food on my aura.

    I could take more consideration of how the music I listen to my affect my aura too, and after these conversations I think I will do.

  36. 36
    Jose Maitas says:

    I believe not everyone can judge, its art well some of it the meaningful rappers. Its not about proper etiquette its not about being a rolemodel. its a detailed path of life that is bred within the inner cities.

    Jose Matias
    Ceo and Founder,
    Rhyme or Reason Productions

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