Blog

Deeper Perception Made Practical

Pornography News Flash

Pornography News Flash. Has today’s porn epidemic affected your love relationships? Take our anonymous Porn Survey Quiz.

Pornography News Flash. About viewing porn, how aware are you that this is even a problem?

Exactly how big a problem do you think it is?

Do you think that porn addiction has affected your life? Either directly or indirectly!

Yesterday my client “Esmeralda” (a.k.a. Gladys) had no clue. That’s why I assigned her to do some research on the scope of today’s porn problem. She emailed me promptly today.

And…

Pornography News Flash!

Esmeralda had no idea, none. Other than some vague sense that, yeah. Some of the guys she’d dated might have used porn sometimes.

Ha! Before I quote what she wrote me, let’s be take a moment. And remember that where there’s life there’s hope.

Also, where there are sessions of RES Energy HEALING and RES Energy READING? Definitely there is hope. Because…

RES Helps to Solve Pornography Problems. Another News Flash!!

True confession. I know quite a lot about porn.

And not because I’ve ever watched a single pornography video.

Everything I know about porn has come from helping RES clients.

  1. Both RES clients who choose to stop using porn.
  2. And RES clients who’ve known their lover was also in love with pornography.
  3. Also, RES clients whose lover was into porn… and my client barely suspected.

Pornography News Flashes. Share Your Experience Here.

In G-rated language, please.

Because I’m planning a follow-up article. How, specifically, can RES help you — or others you know — to protect yourself?

  • Helping you if you’re in that Category 3 I just named.
  • Or help you move past the problem in Category 2.
  • Or even help you if you’re in that Category 1. (For some, help may be needed by a mental health professional or other addictions expert. But for others, some RES sessions have been enough.)

Before that kind of news flash, please add to my little survey here. Comment below with answers to the following questions in a quick-and-anonymous Porn Survey Quiz.

(And use a pseudonym if you like. Type it into the first line of your comment. I’ll do the rest. And would you please, please choose something more interesting than either Joe or Gladys or Anonymous?)

Porn Survey Quiz

  1. Have you personally ever had a problem with porn? How much porn, how often?

  2. If so, did anything specific happen that caused you to realize that you had a problem?

  3. If so, what helped you to overcome it?

  4. Have you personally been involved with a lover who had a problem with porn?

  5. How did that impact your relationship?

  6. Did you stay with that lover?

  7. Any other comments about the impact of pornography on your life?

And now, I’ll summarize what Esmeralda reported to me.

Pornography News Flash #1. How Many Men

In America,  64% of men between the ages of 18-30 view pornography monthly.

While 67% of men aged 31-49 view it monthly

And 49% of men ages 50-68 view it monthly.

Pornography News Flash #2. Denial?

Only 18% of all men think they are addicted. Or aren’t sure if they are.

Pornography News Flash #3. Shocking or Not?

As many as 63% of pastors confirmed they struggle with sex addiction or sexual compulsion.

Pornography News Flash #4. Brain Impacts

Research shows that porn addiction may reduce grey matter in the brain.

Pornography News Flash #5. How Most Kids Grow Up Today

Watching porn at school is seen as typical for 70% of teens in a study. In the US on average kids get their first cell phone by age 10, so 93% of boys have seen online porn before the age of 18.

And a Personal Pornography News Flash.

What Esmeralda Realized

The experts are saying that that some get so dependent on pixels on a screen they cannot get aroused by their real partner! That was my ex and me, for sure.

He wasn’t that into sex. But loved to fantasize. And he liked taking picture of me.

What an eye opener! I’d like to hear more about this topic from your perspective as the founder of RES.

Share this

Join the Discussion

  1. 1
    Isabella C. says:

    Recently I have been doing some research into different social media platforms and their impact on people.

    The “sex positive” and “porn positive” and “kinks are just harmless things you’re entitled to” culture is one of the creepy things that I think is pervasive on reddit, and it negatively impacts people when they’re browsing.

  2. 2
    Kylie says:

    Important men in my life have had this problem, though never someone I’ve dated. I know from SEAH that I have had this problem in a past life.

    And in my job as a librarian, I see many men have this problem, to the point where they don’t even care that other people can see what they are doing.

  3. 3
    Kylie says:

    I think that for many, it is loneliness that drives them, but the activity becomes addictive. What I notice about the men I’ve met with this problem is an energetic heaviness about them.

    In each case, I did not know why I felt so uncomfortable around the person until I learned from RES research sessions that the person had a porn problem.

  4. 4
    Vera L. says:

    The prevailing attitude in my generation and region seems to be that porn is totally normal and if you have a problem with it, you’re just uptight or ashamed of your own sexual nature.

  5. 5
    Vera L. says:

    I once woke up to the sound of a boyfriend using porn in the middle of the night as I slept.

  6. 6
    Vera L. says:

    Before it happened, I wouldn’t have been able to predict just how disturbing this incident turned out to be.

    It was surprisingly disturbing.

  7. 7
    Vera L. says:

    When I insisted that he stop, he made a pouty face and tried to guilt me for “making him feel ashamed.”

    As if there was no difference between this and his mom walking in on him when he was 12.

  8. 8
    Vera L. says:

    There is a prevailing notion around being “sex positive” that you are only truly liberal and good if you accept everything a person is into and never judge it.

    “Sex positive” culture and casual discussion of “kinks” are, in my opinion, ways of using language to distort the truth and mess people up really bad in their sexuality.

  9. 9

    Wow, and this theme is just getting started! Might I suggest this social skill? Forget about the hideous terms like “sex positive” and “kinks.” Because I agree 100% with your assessment, VERA L.

    From now on, simply do this: If any lover or date or “friend,” if anybody treats you like a prostitute who works for free — open to any sexual behavior whatsoever, and with no personal reactions that matter — take notice. And then end the relationship. Period.

  10. 10
    Christine P says:

    I have a question, do you view romance novels in the same category as pornography? I know they are a written as opposed to visual medium but many have sexually explicit scenes so I’m not sure how to categorize them.

  11. 11

    CHRISTINE P, it’s flattering that you’d ask me to be the porno-arbiter about romance novels… which cover a vast range of subjects and writing styles. But, regretfully, that’s really beyond the scope of this quiz… or this blog.

  12. 12
    Ann says:

    I, too, woke up in the middle of the night to a boyfriend watching pornography. I was disgusted, devastated, and in complete shock.

  13. 13
    Ann says:

    He didn’t even care how I felt.

  14. 14
    Ann says:

    I was young, had little to zero guidance from important adults in my life, and zero self-respect.

  15. 15
    Ann says:

    My father was hardly in my life since I was 1. When I tried to grow closer and mend things during my teenage years, I ran into a few awkward situations.

    I came to visit him when I was between 15-17 and he had “Girls Gone Wild” DVDs lined up above his TV.

  16. 16
    Ann says:

    He also picked me up from my mother’s house when I needed a ride somewhere and said “wow, you look hot.”

    Thankfully, no other lines were crossed. It was quite awkward though.

  17. 17
    Plain Jane says:

    This article is making me think of all the times relationships didn’t work out because of the lack of intimacy, because I felt I had to be the “porn star” girlfriend and didn’t measure up, to feeling silly for not being more “adventurous” and complying to “kinks”.

    Feeling not seen and being treated as an object is heart breaking to me.

  18. 18

    POWERFUL JANE — yes, that’s how I’m talking to you now through these next comments — because that’s who you are, powerful!

    I refuse to meet you in that pathetic victim place of “heartbreaking.” Do you have to play the game of becoming whatever a porn addict wants you to be? Surely you’re kidding.

  19. 19

    Either kidding or else you’ve forgotten about a big deal resource you’ve got, called FREE WILL.

    Also CONSUMER SMARTS. Why hire a fool like that for your boyfriend? What’s next, going to strip clubs so you can try to learn from the strippers how to dress better?!@!

  20. 20

    Look, here on earth we can learn from consequences. And you’ve really described it well: Try to succeed at pleasing a porn addict and… get your heart broken.

    Surely you can think of an alternative. There are plenty of men who aren’t addicted to porn. Choose one of them, one who can make you happy. Better yet, live for a while without trying to please any man. And get a stronger experience of who you really are.

  21. 21
    Powerful Jane says:

    Thank you Rose for reminding me of my POWER.

    I used heartbreak more for realizing all the ways I’ve been selling myself short when it comes to my sex life. I am on board to change that.

  22. 22

    Yes, what you’ve written in Comment #21 sounds much more like you, POWERFUL JANE.

    That’s why I wrote strongly and bluntly. Because I knew you could take it and then remember how you’re on board to change the old silliness. Yay, you!

  23. 23
    Gaia says:

    Well… after reading the comments on this post I certainly feel like the odd woman out, because my experiences with porn have been good.

  24. 24
    Gaia says:

    I have always had a really strong sex drive, and never had partners that equally matched it, and had sort of come to a place of (disappointed) acceptance about that as what things would be like for me in my sex life.

    Then at thirty years old, I met a wonderful man with whom I had amazing, connected, consistently great sex, and we were in a relationship for about two years.

  25. 25
    Gaia says:

    I had not watched porn before him, but he definitely watched it and we began watching it together on occasion whenever we felt like it.

    It added to our already very passionate and open, uninhibited sex life.

  26. 26
    Gaia says:

    We didn’t watch it because we needed it— we didn’t need anything but each other to have great sex because our chemistry was fantastic and we just understood each other so well physically.

  27. 27
    Gaia says:

    But the porn only enhanced our lovemaking whenever we did watch it, and we both were very comfortable with it. It made me view porn differently, since before him, I did have judgments about what “types” of people watch it.

    There was nothing addictive, dangerous, or crazy about this man. He was a delicate, sensitive, open, attentive and extremely skillful, sensual lover, romantic to the core.

  28. 28
    Gaia says:

    To this day, he remains the best lover I’ve ever had.

    We eventually broke up, amicably, for reasons having nothing to do with porn, and I went on to date a few other people before I met and married my now husband, but I have nothing but fond memories of that relationship, and that includes the porn we enjoyed together!

  29. 29

    Thank you for sharing your perspective, GAIA. You have, perhaps, spoken for many. And it might be interesting if others with similar experiences were to come forth with comments here.

    My hunch is that your experience was good because of several factors — not typical of dealing with a porn addict but, as you pointed out, a very different experience with pornography.

  30. 30

    1. Your lover wasn’t sneaking around… in contrast to the men described out in Comments #2 (a very shocking comment, actually, if you think about it for a moment), 5-8, and 12-13.

    2. The man who introduced you to porn wasn’t a “solo artist.” He watched porn with you when you felt like it, too.

  31. 31

    3. Together, you used porn to help you become your own porn stars together — having the “very passionate and open, uninhibited sex life” that both of you needed.

    4. Further, after you got what you needed during those two years, you moved on to explore other aspects of life. Many people go through a time when their lives are mostly about sex. That doesn’t have to be a lifelong emphasis.

  32. 32
    Constance says:

    Thanks for bringing up this topic, Rose.

    My last boyfriend used porn regularly, although I doubt he considered it an addiction. He thought it to be perfectly normal behavior.

  33. 33
    Constance says:

    I’m sure his porn use impacted the relationship, as there were many things about him that I found to be confusing.

    In particular, he seemed to more interested in his “idea” of me than the actual me. If I spoke up to say what the real me was thinking or feeling, he actually did not see me as a reasonable source of information about myself!

  34. 34
    Constance says:

    He was also incredibly fixated on my physical appearance, and frequently mentioned how beautiful I was.

    I remember feeling, how odd, I don’t find his comment appealing at all!

  35. 35
    Constance says:

    While normally, such words are very sweet coming from a lover, in this case I couldn’t help but feel it was strange to couple a disregard for my truth with a fixation on my outer appearance.

    I didn’t stay with him, thank goodness.

  36. 36

    Constance, you’re welcome. 🙂 Please thank yourself, not just “goodness,” for evaluating the relationship with this lover and deciding to stop playing his game.

    If it’s not too uncomfortable for you, I’ve got a few questions. Can you tell us what opened your eyes to his porn addiction? Sounds as though you knew about it all along. Did your view of that change?

  37. 37

    And once you figured out, “He is addicted to porn, although he doesn’t know it,” how long did it take for you to appreciate how that addiction was distorting your relationship?

    Further, once you recognized the role that pornography played in his life, how long did it take before you broke up with him?

  38. 38
    Gaia says:

    Thanks for your comment, Rose. And I’m loving your quote: “Together, you used porn to help you become your own porn stars together….”

    Very true, and very cool!

  39. 39
    Renita says:

    It was known in my household that my dad watched porn. He didn’t flaunt it but it was what it was.

    Don’t sneak up on dad while he’s on his special laptop.

  40. 40
    Renita says:

    I remember one day I came home and asked my mom what dad was freaking out about.

    “Oh, he accidentally downloaded some child porn, so he has to destroy his computer.”

  41. 41
    Renita says:

    Re-evaluating as an adult, I wonder if it was really so easy to “accidentally” download child porn.

    I guess I won’t go down that rabbit hole, though.

  42. 42

    Oh, RENITA. You’re right, of course. Porn doesn’t simply download itself.

    I do think you’re wise not to torment yourself in that way, won’t help a thing.

  43. 43

    You’ve reminded me — and also maybe all of you reading this who’ve been told to excuse good-clean-sex-positive-porn….

    Surely this a sign of addiction, not simply enjoyment, that someone could keep pornography around his young children and wife. Evidently, your father was guided by nothing beyond any thought of consequences for anyone but his own notions of pleasure.

  44. 44
    Joy Fay says:

    I have never had a judgment about the “types” who watch porn, because for me it was assumed that everyone did it.

    I am a millennial.

  45. 45
    Joy Fay says:

    Sure, there is porn out there where people are nice to each other in it.

    There is skinemax from back in the day and amateur couples who seem to kind of be interested in each other (though often more in the camera).

  46. 46
    Joy Fay says:

    However, reality check.

    Open up any of the most popular “mainstream” porn websites, and the first thing you will encounter is an onslaught of images of women being abused. (Unless this has recently changed- I doubt it.)

  47. 47
    Joy Fay says:

    Choked, dragged around by their hair while wearing a collar, mascara running down their faces as they cry and “take it”. Having a certain bodily fluid shot in their eyes as a kind of ritual degradation.

    Nothing romantic about it. Abuse plain and simple.

  48. 48

    Oh, JOY FAY, yet more reason to wish that more people would develop essential energetic literacy. Long before getting to that degree of aura-level degradation, sex addicts and porn addicts could get an aura-level reality check.
    Maybe concerned family members or friends could sound an alarm.

  49. 49

    Although this entire series of comments struck me as powerful and eloquent and perceptive, this is what most stood out for me:

    ” who seem to kind of be interested in each other (though often more in the camera).”

  50. 50

    Whenever people are more interested in the camera than in other people (or their own humanity), they are heading in a direction exactly opposite to Enlightenment.

    Again, I look forward to RES making a difference for people who are starting to drift away towards addictive behaviors. Or detachment.

  51. 51

    I’ve helped clients like this in sessions of RES Energy HEALING. It’s important for people to get effective help, whatever kind they choose — provided that the help really helps them turn their lives around, heading back to human and balanced and, to say it again, human.

  52. 52
    Constance says:

    I did know about his porn addiction all along.

    I wasn’t crazy about it, and just decided to hold it in abeyance for a while.

  53. 53
    Constance says:

    What did change things for me was having a session with you. You read his Sexual Integrity databank and found he had an active porn and fantasy life.

    In addition, you read his aura during an instance when he was making love to me, and it turned out he was not really present with me but off in his own fantasy land!

  54. 54
    Constance says:

    I thought, wait a minute, he always wants more sex and thinks sex is highlight of the relationship — and yet he is not even present with me during those moments?

    I’m just a just a live prop for his fantasies?

  55. 55
    Constance says:

    Suddenly, I realized that I WAS a live prop for his fantasies — on so many levels!

    He used to assume that most of my motives for anything — the way I dressed, the way I moved, the way I spoke, even my everyday gestures — were all about seducing him or pleasing him.

  56. 56
    Constance says:

    I had found all of this baffling, but now his interpretations made more sense. In his mind, he was the star of his porn movie, and he was giving me the role of a supporting player in it.

    Once I realized what was going on, I broke up the following week. I’m so glad I had that session with you, Rose! Life has literally been more colorful and emotionally vivid ever since 😉 I wasn’t fully aware of the energy it took to deal with him.

  57. 57

    Thanks for answering my questions, and also for your shout-out. CONSTANCE, I was curious.

    And your response was stunningly insightful. All the more peculiar that such a brilliant, creative woman would accept — for any length of time — being treated like the Stormy Daniels of a man’s life.

  58. 58

    Please consider this idea, all you Blog-Buddies. If you’re in a love relationship, or even just dating, and you learn that your partner has an addiction… take that seriously.

    And no, contrary to popular cliches of the moment, “addictions” to coffee, sugar, meat are not really addictions. More like addictions to pornography, alcohol, marijuana — they count. So count them as what Tina Fey has called “Deal Breakers.”

  59. 59

    Millennial or older, you’re not being “judgmental” by calling a spade a spade. And by calling an addict an addict.

    Spare yourself a world of hurt. Break up early. Don’t put it off, falling more deeply in love ever day. Or even blaming yourself, believing the stinking thinking of the addict that you’re not sexually free, etc. Use your self-authority, please!

  60. 60
    Maisie says:

    Plain Jane, I can relate to your comment 17.

    I once had a boyfriend who was very upset at how we were having less and less sex and didn’t understand why. I realized and then explained that I felt like he expected me to be just like a porn star and I didn’t want to do things or act like I was in a porn movie!

  61. 61
    Maisie says:

    It was so upsetting and hurtful and damaging to be expected to behave in that way and he expressed surprise that I felt that way.

    He changed for a while, but ultimately, though he wasn’t addicted to porn as far as I am aware, his way of relating to women didn’t change and soon he expected the same kind of moves/behavior and/or more “kinky” things.

  62. 62
    Maisie says:

    I can also relate to comment 44 from Joy Fay, as a millennial… it has been totally normalized to watch porn.

    Boys would talk about it at school or “accidentally” show you videos. Guys at college would sometimes put extreme porn videos on as a “joke” in a social gathering (with both men and women in the group).

  63. 63
    Constance says:

    Regarding Comment 57, ah, “being treated as the Stormy Daniels of a man’s life.” That’s a great phrase.

    Well, the relationship was a learning experience, clearly. I’m back to living my own life now, and brimming with creative ideas and projects– just how I like it 😉

  64. 64
    Constance says:

    Regarding Comment 58, I think I didn’t take his porn addiction seriously because he had told me he was into “erotica,” where it was mostly about couples who were “who seem to kind of be interested in each other.”

    I did wonder early on whether that had any effects on his aura, mostly because I had never dated anyone before who was a regular consumer of porn.

  65. 65
    Constance says:

    Regarding 59, on the topic of an addict’s stinking thinking: I remember being confused by my boyfriend’s adamant assertions that I was not sexually up to par in certain ways.

    When I expressed reticence about some things he was interested in, he told me I was not “sexually empathic” to his needs/desires and did not have “sexual stamina” or an adequate “sexual attention span.” Honestly, I just thought his suggestions were extremely uninteresting

  66. 66

    CONSTANCE, congratulations on emerging still further from the trance-like experience of semi-denial about your ex’s porn addiction.

    Two observations, in case they may help. First, he was clearly educated, dressing his stinking thinking in fancy language. Ridiculous language.

  67. 67

    There’s no such thing as a “sexual attention span.” However, there sure are inadequate, self-absorbed lovers. And there are also demanding lovers who won’t take no for an answer if you’re not into that type of kinky.

    Blaming language all dressed up fancy. Don’t believe any of it… any longer.

  68. 68

    As for being “sexually empathic”? As the most experienced empath coach around, I can assure you, there is nothing like “Sexual Empath.” No more than there are “Golf Empaths” or “Canoe Empaths.”

    Guess the man isn’t capable of more accurate language, such as, “I’m used to masturbating with you as my prop, all dressed up in my addiction-tinged fantasies. Now you’re proving inadequate to the the job that I assign to you.”

  69. 69

    Second of all, and the main reason I brought up how this guy hid behind fancy language, let’s be clear about your Comment #64.

    When telling you just a bit about his addiction to pornography, your ex-lover lied.

  70. 70
    January says:

    I know of two people in my workplace who are porn addicts. One because he was caught watching porn at work, the other through sessions with Rose seeking to problem solve issues I had been having with him at work.

    It’s clear to me, both men are severely impacted by their habit.

  71. 71
    January says:

    One is subject to intense speculation as to his increasing insular and odd behavior and is known to barely say two words to anyone all day at work.

    The other, I have known well for many years and I can see that he is more and more shy and less comfortable expressing himself.

  72. 72
    January says:

    Neither of these men have had any dating life to speak of whatsoever in all the time I’ve known them.

  73. 73
    Constance says:

    Thanks so much for your clarifications about my ex-lover’s fancy language. I am learning so much here!

  74. 74
    Constance says:

    You’re right — he was basically saying I wasn’t adequate to the job he had assigned me.

    That was conveyed many times throughout the relationship in several different contexts.

  75. 75
    Constance says:

    And thank you especially for this, in comment 69: When telling you just a bit about his addiction to pornography, your ex-lover LIED.

    Yikes, I had not been aware of that!

  76. 76
    Harry says:

    This is an engaging discussion on porn use.

    I think it has become an epidemic around the world. It’s become popular in most every society and it’s incredibly easy to find, even if you’re not looking for it.

  77. 77
    Harry says:

    I imagine the overall results for relationships, in both the macro and micro sense, are not positive.

    Based on aura research I’ve done, porn positions the viewer in the astral realm. It has an addictive quality akin to drug use.

  78. 78
    Harry says:

    Its popularity makes a lot of sense. It’s very compelling for its users, an instant, on demand sex show culminating in a very powerful endorphin rush (orgasm).

  79. 79
    Harry says:

    I think many porn users deserve compassion as they don’t necessarily know the damage they’re causing themselves and their partners (should they have one, although in my experience, compulsive porn use often precludes the formation of actual sexual relationships. I had a friend who was a 28 year old virgin who didn’t see a link with his daily porn use and his dead love life.)

  80. 80
    Harry says:

    I use to use porn myself, but was able to stop in part with help from RES sessions.

    The aura level effects were interesting, something along the lives of “wanting to stop watching, feeling gross about myself and what I’m seeing, but being entranced and unable to look away.”

  81. 81
    Harry says:

    I would often feel gross after watching porn, but sometime down the line would feel drawn to watch again.

    (The classic cycle of an addict).

  82. 82
    Harry says:

    It doesn’t seem like widespread awareness of the potential pitfalls of porn will come anytime soon (much like weed, imo) so the smartest thing to do is to protect ourselves from its effects, both as users and people in relationships with users.

  83. 83
    Harry says:

    I am curious though about its macro level effects on societies. I was recently watching a documentary on Japan where it said more than 40% of Japanese millennials are virgins, a large amount of married couples don’t have sex, and there are increasing numbers of young men who never leave the house, instead living virtual fantasy lives on the web.

    A survey found that 70% of young Japanese men were not in relationships.

  84. 84
    Harry says:

    There are interrelated economic and cultural factors here, but a push towards living our lives on the web, engaging in life through fantasy, and using porn and other escapist sexual outlets seems to be part of the collateral damage of the great connective power of the internet.

  85. 85

    Wonderful comments all, JANUARY and CONSTANCE and HARRY.

    For those of you who regularly read this blog and know about the importance of adjusting well to “human vibrational frequencies,” I particularly flag Comment #77. Very true. Also, very important in its implications.

  86. 86
    Kylie says:

    Harry, I think you are right on with comment number 77.

    That is what I was noticing, with the auric modeling of porn users, a similarity to alcoholics/drug users.

  87. 87
    Kylie says:

    I had also read about this phenomenon in Japan you mention in comment 83. It seems to me that other societies are heading in the same direction, it’s just more advanced there.

    And yes, to comment 84. I think this is what Christine was getting at in comment number 11. There are a lot of people (including myself in the past) who get caught up in binge escapist romantic programming, that while not on the level of porn, replaces actual human relationships.

  88. 88
    Kylie says:

    It is addictive, and the more time that you spend watching, the less time you have for creating a social life, and starting to date.

    And also, the more it becomes difficult for an imperfect human relationship to live up to your expectations.

  89. 89
    Jean says:

    Thank you Rose for this post – and many thanks to all for the brave and helpful comments.

    Changes galore here at Earth School these days – changes that directly and indirectly affect so many aspects of human life. Knowledge is indeed helpful. Grateful to have this community to learn with.

  90. 90
    Beyond says:

    It effects your whole life. Think about your body mass producing constant dopamine levels, that’s not healthy So many sages and mystics you can read from like Don juan matus and Napolean Hill that emphasize the importance of sexual energy. In fact one of the biggest secrets to a persons life is his/her conservation of sexual energy. Not a moral matter but simply a matter of having MORE energy and more awareness and not living in that animal mind set polarized and irritated with everything that goes around us. It’s a primordial urge and needs to be tamed and turned into a wonderful phoenix born again from the ashes. but ya porn is good sometimes 😛

  91. 91

    Blog-Buddies, yesterday I completed this short series of posts with “Porn Farewell. RES Can Help.”

    Come have a look. Also, check out a new game we’re starting there at Comments 13-18: “Training Porn Viewers that You Won’t Be in Their Movie.”

  92. 92

    Recently someone alerted me to research about the impact of porn on marriage. As you can imagine, there are loads of studies, none of them encouraging about how pornography is just a healthy hobby for the sexually open.

    Just one example: This study which explored the consequences of watching porn: For men, the chance of divorce went from 5% to 10%. For women, that number jumped from 6% to 18%. To put it bluntly, divorce rates double with watching pornography.

Click here to comment ...

Leave Your Comment