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Posts Tagged ‘cleaning up’

Messy Psychic Coercion and Woe in a Cord of Attachment to Marie Kondo

Twirling around like a pinwheel? Cutting cords of attachment can help.

Twirling around like a pinwheel? Cutting cords of attachment can help.

Life on this planet of polarities sure includes plenty of variety: Happy and sad, kind and unkind, lovely and hideous, neat and messy.

It’s enough to make a person twirl around like a pinwheel. (And not in a nice way.)

Even a beautiful teacher of tidyness can become the cordee in a pretty nasty cord of attachment. That was shown to me anew when I helped my client Joe to remove his cord of attachment to Marie Kondo.

Tossing Certain Ideas about Tidying Up

Oh no, soooo embarrassed!

Oh no, soooo embarrassed!

No need to blush, British readers. In fact I think all you Blog-Buddies will be able to handle today’s article just fine — and without trembling — when I recount the tossing away of my first reaction to Marie Kondo’s method for Tidying Up.

If you don’t get how WILDLY controversial my language about “tossing” is here ;-), just check out yesterday’s blog post, Comment #7.

And definitely, everyone, you can anticipate an inspiring tale of less is more. Specifically I’m going to share some ideas I discarded, and some perspective I gained, on the perennially important art of tidying up.

The author of “The Lifechanging Magic of Tidying Up” is a brilliant inspiration to neat people everywhere. Personally I learned a lot from all the responses to my blog post about the “revolutionary KonMari Method for simplifying, organizing, and storing.”

What is the main thing I learned? And how might this be very useful to you, as well?

Tidying up Just Enough? RES Perspective on Marie Kondo's Bestselling Method

Too much shopping, too much tossing -- can there be problems either way?

Too much shopping, too much tossing — can there be problems either way?

On Black Friday, how many people will be buying “The Lifechanging Magic of Tidying Up” by Marie Kondo?

I wonder, and not just because I have an eye for irony.

“Black Friday” is, of course, a post-post-modern American tradition, where you start Christmas shopping on Thanksgiving Day and go at it full force on the following day (which is always a Friday). Then binge-shop for several more days, merrily scooping up bargains as you go.

This year it is estimated that 135.8 million consumers may shop between Thanksgiving Day and through the weekend until “Cyber Monday” (when the shopping goes online).

What, is one of America’s loveliest holidays — our collective day of gratitude — really becoming the day to go out and shop ’till you drop?”

Gotta love Earth School, right? Because we spiritual idealists might have to weep if we didn’t sometimes remember to laugh.