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Receiving Prayer

Receiving Prayer

Receiving Prayer. Yes, let’s honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by launching a series on prayer to bring results.

Let’s celebrate this holiday — and prayer itself — with a new term: “Receiving prayer.”

Receiving prayer means that you pray in order to receive what you desire. It’s that simple. (At least the definition is simple, anyway.)

Practically speaking, what is “Receiving Prayer”? How can we pray effectively, for human results and also for spiritual awakening?

Let Today Be a Holiday that Includes a Receiving Prayer

When you have a dream, how can you do a Receiving Prayer?

Face Reading Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Face Reading Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for inspiration

Face Reading Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for inspiration

Let us turn our thoughts today to Martin Luther King. And the only national holiday in America named after a person… who was not a U.S. president. (Or a white male.)

For the collective consciousess of America, as well as our most personal aspirations for justice in this land, today is our most spiritually important secular holiday. I am honored to celebrate with a face reading of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

When love is in the content of your character, the ordinariness of marriage equality

 

When love refines the content of your character

When love refines the content of your character

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., being honored today throughout America, famously said:

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Yesterday I attended a kind of wedding party that was a first for me. It taught me a great deal about what it could mean, having love at the core of your character.

That wedding party  also educated me about a new kind of legal love in America, made possible by a shift in collective consciousness during our lifetimes, Blog-Buddies.

In a growing number of American states, that shift to our collective consciousness — and the law — allows marriage equality.

Yesterday my husband MITCH and I  attended a wedding party in honor of JOE and JOHN. (In today’s article I’m not using names of the party guests out of respect for the privacy of people involved, none of whom saw my invisible “Blog Press Credentials.”)

An ordinary celebration of marriage between two men

The happy couple married recently at a county courthouse in Maryland. A few wedding-time pictures were taken in front of some lovely flowers. Plastic flowers. Courthouse variety.

Yesterday’s follow-up party for friends took place at a lovely Marriott hotel, one known for outstanding food. With real flowers.

In many respects, this was simply an ordinary wedding reception, timed a bit after the legal wedding ceremony. Good food. Good music. Lovely meeting rooms at a comfortably appointed hotel.

This was no Bridezilla bash, nothing ostentatious. Guests were the couple’s friends from a variety of social contexts, everyone meeting and mingling. Wine flowed freely, and so did the  conversation.

Before this event, in response to questions about bridal registry, JOE had written to us guests that our presence would be gift enough

 “We have been together for 30 years. We already have everything we need.”

Imagine, married yet not-legally-married for three decades!